huji Department of Environmental Economics and Management

Robert H. Smith Faculty of Agriculture, Food and Environment,
The Hebrew University of Jerusalem

eyal ert

Ert Eyal


Senior lecturer of Behavioral Sciences and Management
Department of Environmental Economics and Management,
Robert H. Smith Faculty of Agriculture, Food and Environment,
The Hebrew University of Jerusalem,
P.O.Box 12, Rehovot, 76100, Israel

Tel: +972-(0)8-9489375(office)

Email: Eyal.Ert@mail.huji.ac.il

Research Overview:

Economists view people’s decisions as reflecting stable inherent constructs such as “risk attitudes.” Psychologists, on the other hand, argue that decisions are mostly contextual in nature. My research focus on the intersection between these two approaches by evaluating how stable constructs and situational factors interact. My coleagues and I discern stable constructs that underlie judgments, and use them to predict risk-taking behavior and explain individual differences. At the same time we highlight the boundaries of these constructs and evaluate the relative effect of contextual factors such as the effect of losses, exposure to others decisions, and past experience.

Current Research Topics:

  • Adaptive decision-making and decisions from experience

  • Constructs of risk-taking and risk perception

  • Losses as situational effects

  • Social influences and impacts of others' behavior

  • Choice prediction competitions

Recent papers:

  • Golan, H., & Ert, E. (in press). Pricing decisions from experience: The roles of information acquisition and response mode. Cognition

  • Ert, E., & Trautmann, S. T. (2014). Sampling experience reverses preferences for ambiguity. Journal of Risk and Uncertainty. 49: 31-42.

  • Ert, E., & Erev, I. (2013). On the descriptive value of loss aversion in decisions under risk: Six clarifications. Judgment and Decision Making. 8: 214-235.

    And see our last "choice prediction competition" (with Ido Erev and Al Roth) on social preferences in extensive form games .

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